Homemade pickles contain beneficial enzymes that aid digestion and overall health.  The fermentation process changes the sweetness of the vegetables into a useful enzyme that aids digestion and strengthens the stomach and intestines. They also help reduce cravings, especially for sweets. When foods containing beneficial bacteria are eaten consistently over time, digestive issues, bloating, and belly fat will greatly decrease. Your immune system will be stronger too. Eat a few pieces daily with a meal.

Traditional cultures have used naturally pickled foods for thousands of years as a digestive aid.

Pickles are easy to make.  Supermarket pickles are quickly processed and do not contain beneficial bacteria.  Summer pickles are lighter and pickled a short time; winter pickles are those that are pickled for a longer time. Salt fermented pickles have a stronger therapeutic effect.

Use a pickle press or glass or ceramic jar.  For a pickle press, click this link:  2.2 Liter Round Tsukemono Pickle Press #546323 .

For a very high quality fermenting crock for sauerkraut and other vegetables click this link:

Kerazo – 5L (1.3 Gal)K&K Keramik German Made Fermenting Crock Pot, Kerazo F2 for making sauerkraut and other fermented vegetables – manufactured in Germany

Soy Sauce Vinegar Pickles

Cucumber Pickles

Daikon Pickles

Red Onion Pickles

Beet Pickles


Soy Sauce/Vinegar Pickles

Heat a mixture of half wheat-free soy sauce or tamari and half water (1/2 cup each or more depending on how many pickles you want to make).  Let cool.  Add 2 TB. brown rice vinegar.  Use root, ground, or any sturdy vegetable such as carrots, turnips, beets, daikon, radishes, broccoli, cauliflower.  Place the liquid in a glass jar and add the vegetables. Cover with a cheesecloth and let sit for 3 or 5 days unrefrigerated, and then refrigerate.  Eat a few pieces with one meal daily.


Cucumber Pickles

2 cups cucumbers, sliced thin
2 Tablespoons brown rice vinegar
1 1/2 teaspoons unrefined sea salt

Place all ingredients in a pickle press and mix thoroughly.  Place top on pickle press and screw down  When water level rises to pressure plate, release pressure slightly and let sit for 2-3 hours.

If you do not have a pickle press, place all ingredients in a glass or ceramic bowl and mix thoroughly.  place a plate on top of the ingredients and apply weight such as a gallon water bottle, or a clean brick–anything heavy.

After 2-3 hours, squeeze out the excess liquid and eat a small serving with one meal daily.  If they taste too salty, rinse them.


Daikon Pickles

1 1/2 cups thinly sliced daikon radish

1/2 cup thinly sliced celery

1 teaspoon grated lemon rind

1/4 teaspoon unrefined sea salt

Place all ingredients in a pickle press and mix thoroughly.  Place top on pickle press and screw down  When water level rises to pressure plate, release pressure slightly and let sit for 24 hours unrefrigerated.

If you do not have a pickle press, place all ingredients in a glass or ceramic bowl and mix thoroughly.  place a plate on top of the ingredients and apply weight such as a gallon water bottle, or a clean brick–anything heavy.


Red Onion Pickles

2 medium red onions

1 cup vinegar—umeboshi, brown rice or apple cider

1 tsp. unrefined sea salt

Optional:  clove of garlic; ½ cup fresh rosemary, oregano, thyme or cilantro or a combination.

Drop onions into boiling water for about 10-20 seconds. Drain and run cold water over them to stop the cooking.  Place in a glass jar with vinegar, salt and fresh herbs.  Stir or shake jar to submerge the onions and herbs.  Add more vinegar if necessary.  Cover with a cheesecloth or cotton dish towel and let sit at room temperature for 24 hours, then refrigerate.  They are ready to eat.

NOTE:  4-5 cloves, a dash of allspice, cinnamon stick, and black pepper are nice additions for cold weather pickles.


Pickled Beets

  • 4 or 5 beets (medium size)
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar or umeboshi vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp brown rice syrup or raw, unprocessed honey
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard powder
  • 1/8 tsp. unrefined sea salt and pepper to taste
  1. Peel and cut beets to uniform sizes so they will cook evenly. Steam or boil around 30 minutes or until done.  A fork easily inserted into the beet will tell you if the beets are done or not.
  2. Drain the beets, rinsing them in cold water to stop the cooking.. Slice the beets.
  3. Make the vinaigrette by combining the vinegar, rice syrup, olive oil, and dry mustard.
  4. Whisk ingredients together with a fork. The dry mustard will help to emulsify the vinaigrette. Adjust to taste. Add salt and pepper to taste. Combine beets and vinaigrette in a bowl and allow to marinate at room temperature 4-8 hours, then refrigerate.

Note:  You can also add 1 tsp. allspice and 1 tsp. cloves to the marinade.  Umeboshi vinegar contains salt, so if using it, reduce the amount of salt you use.